Posts Tagged ‘ Death Valley ’

Four Days, Fifteen Artists, Death Valley

Four Days, Fifteen Artists, Death Valley

In March, 2012, after 40 years of enjoying visits and painting Death Valley, I brought in reinforcements in the form of eight artist friends to help me capture the beauty of this magical place. The paint-out led me to publish Painting Death Valley to inspire other artists to take up the challenge. The outcome was so rewarding that a return in March 2013 was virtually a no-brainer. I returned this time with 12 friends and two photographers to document the event. The new book, Painting in Death Valley Again (excerpts below) complements the first and is largely about the artists…

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Sharing Death Valley with Artist Friends

Ed. note: Jim Trolinger’s new book Painting in Death Valley is a must for desert artists and their fans. See ordering info at the end of the article. After 40 years of visiting and painting Death Valley I still enjoy returning to this magnificent place.  Boasting over three million acres and 130 miles long, it is the largest National Park in the contiguous USA. Amazingly, in all those visits I have never encountered other artists. A Google search for Death Valley artists turns up a meager two or three, even though the park service offers an artist-in-residence program.  The Fall…

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Eva Slater: The Death Valley Journey of a Modern Artist

Life in the Slater household in 1950s Orange County was like living in a mid-century modern postcard. John and Eva Slater and their kids, Dan and Miriam, lived in a custom-built A-frame house aligned with the North Star. John Slater worked as an inventor and chief scientist at Autonetics—what could be more Space Age? Eva Slater, born in Berlin, Germany, in 1922, was part of a cool modern art movement called Hard Edge. She and her artist friend Helen Lundeberg were both inspired by the geometry of the desert; both made trips to Death Valley and Palm Springs. Yet, only…

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Janet Morgan and Gregory Frux: Bringing Back Expedition Art

Long before the first art gallery opened on El Paseo, US Army expedition artists of the 1800s sketched the desert on foot. Baldwin Mollhausen braved wolves, grizzlies and snowstorms to make the earliest sketches of the Needles area. For survey artists like Mollhausen tramping through the sands was an essential part of painting a picture. Today most landscape artists survey the terrain from a comfortable vehicle. However, some artists have returned to the original concept of art as a form of exploration, even risk-taking. The British artist Tony Foster, for instance, creates watercolor diaries of the world’s wild places while…

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Lin Moore’s “Lovely Rock” at Maturango Museum through May 4th

Lin Moore’s “Lovely Rock” at Maturango Museum through May 4th

Oregon photographer Lin Moore explores the properties of desert rock in an exhibit at Maturango Museum in Ridgecrest through May 4th: “This Goodly Frame: Reveries Among the Origins of Order.” Moore has written about the link between poetry and photography and is especially inspired by the poet Robinson Jeffers, who lived in a rock tower in Carmel and could not say enough about rock: Lovely rock Living rock Lonely rock Pure naked rock Starting with the basalt cliffs at Smith Rock near his central Oregon home, Moore graduated to the advanced academy of rock, the California desert. He had been…

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Fernand Lungren “The Desert Speaks” Exhibit in Los Olivos

Fernand Lungren “The Desert Speaks” Exhibit in Los Olivos

August 2, 2010–If you’re traveling anywhere near Santa Barbara before September 19th, consider detouring to Los Olivos to see works by Fernand Lungren, who’s been called the foremost desert painter of the early 1900s. Lungren, who was a resident of Santa Barbara for much of his life, has been undersung. He mistrusted art dealers and was reluctant to sell his work, so he remained less-known than more self-promoting artists. The show at the Wildling Art Museum should help to fix that. While the colorful deserts of Maynard Dixon or John Hilton may be more instantly accessible, Lungren’s deserts resemble what…

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